Gateway 8 Academic Gala Day 2016

In Week 4, two talented teams of eight students represented William Carey at the Gateway 8 Academic Gala Day. The theme of the day was ‘Time‘ with teams completing a number of subject based challenges around the theme.

This is the fifth year that William Carey has participated in the Gala Day. Both the 7/8 and 9/10 teams had a great time competing against similar students from private schools all over Sydney.

A big congratulations to the Year 9/10 team who achieved an overall place of 3rd out of 23 teams. Well done!

Below are photos of the day and the students that participated.

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Year 9/10 team

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Year 7/8 team

 

Australian Brain Bee Challenge

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On Monday 22nd August, Esther P (Year 10) represented William Carey Christian School at the Regional Finals of the Australian Brain Bee Challenge, a competition for high school students to learn about neuroscience. In addition to participating in live questions at the final, she also experienced a day of activities to educate her about neuroscience research at UWS.

Although Esther did not make it to the next round (national finals) she did a great Brain-Facts-PDFjob representing her school.

Well done Esther!

Congratulations Kirti!

Runner up in the What Matters? Writing Competition 2016

Kirti Sharma’s (Year 10) entry Human Trafficking – A Crime Against Humanity was selected byKirti the judges as the NSW/ACT runner-up in the Year 9/10 category.

The What Matters? Writing Competition is run each year by the Whitlam Institute. Entrants write a 400-600 word opinion piece on what matters to them and why. This year the institute received a record 3754 entries!

Kirti has been invited to attend an awards ceremony in August where she will receive a prize and participate in a writing workshop conducted by author Bernard Cohen.

A big congratulations Kirti on your achievement!

Read Kirti’s prize winning entry below.

 

HUMAN TRAFFICKING – A CRIME AGAINST HUMANITY

 

In a world that has embraced man’s unconditional control over another, the gratuitous enslavement of human beings embodies a profligate crisis facing the globe.

Human trafficking is a crime against humanity, it involves the act of recruiting, transporting, transferring, harbouring or receiving a person through the use of force or coercion for the purpose of exploiting them.[i] It is a global phenomenon that is found in every nation and manifests itself in the forms of sex trafficking, forced labour, domestic servitude and organ harvesting.

A form of modern day slavery, human trafficking threatens the dignity of persons.[ii] The Universal Declaration of Human Rights clearly states in Article 4 “No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.”[iii] Through this declaration, it is evident that this is not universally accepted in society, as human trafficking is a far more pressing problem in the modern world than originally thought. Officially, worldwide slavery ended more than a century ago. Unofficially, it’s a growth industry that will continue to expand.

Poverty and gender discrimination lies at the heart of human trafficking.[iv] In sex trafficking, women and children are diminished to the status of a gratifying sexual commodity and are commonly trafficked into the commercial sex industries. On the other hand, men are usually trafficked into tough labour jobs, while children are trafficked into labour positions in sweatshops and domestic industries. It has become an organized billion dollar industry that generates thirty two billion dollars annually and has at its core, investors, recruiters and corrupt public officials as participants. Globalisation has given birth to a service industry completely devoted to providing transportation, forged documents and accounting assistance.[v]

Human trafficking is a system based on greed, control and power.[1][vi] Victims are threatened to, lied to and beaten. Traffickers use deception, fraud, threats and other psychological coercion to make promises of improvements in getting jobs, education and a better life. They prey on the vulnerabilities of people who are poor, uneducated, neglected, unemployed or immigrants.[vii] Escape is inevitable and almost impossible. However, all this can change, as life does not get better by chance, it gets better by change. For starters, human trafficking is a global problem that requires a global solution. Raising awareness in countries where human trafficking hits the hardest, can help start the change that the world needs to see. Educating and helping individuals in understanding the nature of trafficking can encourage civilians to look for signs of trafficking in a person. It should not take a little motivation to encourage the community to take action, it should be in our character and personality to help those who need it the most, to show compassion to those who need it and to help people recognise the difference between right and wrong. It should be in our humanity.

There is no doubt now that the world we know will always exhibit in creating disconnected individuals everyday. Human trafficking is one of the greatest ethical challenges facing modern times. Eradicating human trafficking needs to start with change and if humanity is willing to allow that change to occur. The human mind is the most complex organ belonging to any species on earth. But in the complexity lies the thought of enslaving others for profit. Caught between the sadistic system are the lives of thousands of men, women and children who are innocent and are trapped in the clutches of a sea of oppression, as their freedom, rights and dignity are stolen from them.

[i] United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. (n.d.). Retrieved June 28, 2016, from https://www.unodc.org/nigeria/en/human-trafficking.html Definition of Human Trafficking

[ii] Resources on Human Trafficking ‘Against Humanity’ (n.d.). Retrieved June 28, 2016, from http://www.catholicreligiousaustralia.org.au/index.php/news-a-views/our-stories/item/2065-resources-on-human-trafficking-from-against-humanity

[iii] Human Rights No Slavery: UN Universal Declaration Violations & Abuse, Torture & Slavery,. (n.d.). Retrieved June 28, 2016, from http://www.humanrights.com/what-are-human-rights/violations-of-human-rights/slavery-and-torture.html

[iv] “Human Trafficking” by Sandhya Bhat and Catherine Pushpam Joseph. (2012). Retrieved June 28, 2016, from http://www.carnegiecouncil.org/publications/articles_papers_reports/0149

[v] “Human Trafficking” by Sandhya Bhat and Catherine Pushpam Joseph. (2012). Retrieved June 28, 2016, from http://www.carnegiecouncil.org/publications/articles_papers_reports/0149

[vi] What is human trafficking. (2016). Retrieved June 28, 2016, from http://www.stopthetraffik.org/uk/page/what-is-human-trafficking

[vii] Victims of Trafficking – Florida Department of Health. (2015, February 02). Retrieved from http://www.floridahealth.gov/programs-and-services/community-health/refugee-health/_documents/victims-of-trafficking.pdf

100 Word Story winners!

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During Term 2 the 100 word short story competition ran for a third year.

We had even more entries this year from both seniors and juniors.

As with last year, a number of creative, imaginative and well written stories were entered, providing firm proof that it is possible to write a compelling story with only a limited number of words.  As a result, the talented entries made the task of choosing a winner quite difficult for the judges.

However, after much deliberation, two winners were chosen. Below are their winning entries:

Senior winner – Elizabeth H (Year 12)

The scent of caramelised applies invades the house, filling her nostrils as she opens the door. This is a bad sign – Mother always bakes when she’s troubled. Bustling back and forth, flour dusted across her knuckles, flecks of sugar on her nose, as if a tart will save her. Except there is smoke swirling around the ceiling, the cinnamon smells burnt and she swallows twice, heart clenched. She steps into the kitchen, an avalanche of insanity poured into pastry, tables heaped with gleaming meringues, perfectly iced gingerbread men. Her mother lay on the floor, spatula in open hand, gun in the other.

The blood looks like jam.

Junior winner- Lauren R (Year 9)

I show her reflection as she stares into my waters. She does not see how my body is boundless as I constantly meander past. She is absorbed in my shallow exterior but beneath that layer of serenity I am a lifeline to multitudes. She stares and does not consider the  magnificence which I hold below. She fleetingly acknowledges my  visible resplendence but depreciates  the depth withheld by my façade .

Raging beneath her reflection is a tempestuous universe that is my very  own. She departs, unaware of my brilliance.  She can only see my surface, just as I only show hers.

Philosophy Program Update

 

 

Philosophy
The Philosophy Program started running again in Term 1 and students have already delved into a number of philosophical issues.

Selected students from Years 7-11 have met once a fortnight to discuss and examine different aspects of Philosophy. So far the students have learnt about:

  • Knowledge and the mindPicture1
  • Logic and paradoxes
  • Aesthetics and philosophy
  • Friedrich Nietzsche and his ideas
  • Blaise Pascal and his ideas (‘Pascal’s wager & imagination)
  • Søren Kierkegaard and his ideas

One of the benefits of the Philosophy Program is that students are given the opportunity to consider what they believe, why they believe it and challenge the ideas of others in a positive environment whilst developing a love of wisdom.

Below is a link to a Crash Course Philosophy video that was watched and discussed by the students in the program recently.

 

Tournament of the Minds 2016

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Tournament of the Minds is again running in 2016!

TOM is a problem solving competition for students in Years 7 to 10 in which teams compete against other schools by solving a mixture of challenges.

Tournament of the Minds will begin in Term 2 and will be sending a team to represent William Carey at the regional finals in mid-August.

Any students who are interested in participating can collect an application form from Miss Smith in the HSIE staffroom or download one here

What Matters?

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‘What Matters? is a writing competition that gives Year 5 – 12 students
in  NSW and the ACT a chance to say what matters to them in society today.

Students write a 400-600 word opinion piece on what matters to them and why. Entries must be typed on A4 paper.

‘The Years 7/8 category winners will each receive a full-day creative writing workshop donated by The Writing Workshop, conducted by award-winning author Bernard Cohen.

The Year 9/10 category winner will be invited to spend a day at the Inspire Foundation, meeting the ReachOut.com Crew and receiving professional training. They will also be offered the opportunity to be paid $200 to produce a feature article for the ReachOut.com website.

The Year 11/12 category winner will receive a 1 Year Membership to the NSW Writers’ Centre, and the opportunity to participate in a one-day writing workshop donated by the NSW Writers’ Centre. The Year 11/12 category winner will also receive a book voucher to the value of $100.

If you would like to enter, collect an entry form from Miss Smith in the HSIE staffroom or download it from the link below.

Entries must be returned to Miss Smith by the end of the term for you to be able to enter!

Click here for the entry form

Mathematics Challenge for Young Australians (MCYA)

amt-logoThis year William Carey is again offering a new series of challenging enrichment courses for our top mathematicians. This course is designed and managed by the Australian Mathematics Trust (AMT) which is the key organisation that runs mathematics competitions (Olympiads) in the country. The Mathematics Challenge for Young Australians is targeted towards students with a talent in mathematics who would like something more.

The challenge lasts for 16 weeks between April and September. The program focuses on teaching additional mathematics not traditionally taught at high school and students are encouraged to develop their ability to prove results not just get the correct answer. The program is very challenging and students should not expect to easily master the skills involved.

As part of this program each student would be expected to spend roughly 30 minutes – one hour each week working through the providing resources and attempting the challenge for each chapter.

Students who successfully complete the program will have their diligence and achievement recognised in their yearly reports. An extra subject will be included in their reports including their overall mark in the program they completed and a comment about their work.

Details of the different programs are available here.

Please contact Miss Smith for more information!